Managing sleep problems – a medication-free approach (iv) — HealthSkills Blog

The fourth step in learning to sleep well within an ACT framework, is build. My previous posts were: Discover and Accept and Welcome. In build, we’re beginning to build new practices. This is about learning how much sleep you need, and when you need to head to bed and wake up again. I know when […]

via Managing sleep problems – a medication-free approach (iv) — HealthSkills Blog

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Managing sleep problems – a medication-free approach (iii) — HealthSkills Blog

More on sleeping the ACT way. Step one was discover – all the things you’re doing to help yourself sleep, but in your attempts to control the uncontrollable (thoughts, feelings, memories, worries, sensations, the environment and so on). And hopefully you’ve seen that these things can be counter-productive. That flash new pillow and bed is […]

via Managing sleep problems – a medication-free approach (iii) — HealthSkills Blog

Managing sleep problems – a medication-free approach (ii) — HealthSkills Blog

Last week I described the “conventional” CBT for insomnia approach (CBTi), but this week I want to introduce an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) approach which is superficially similar to CBTi but holds to some of the fundamental principles of ACT: mindfulness, and letting go of control. As is typical for ACT, there are no […]

via Managing sleep problems – a medication-free approach (ii) — HealthSkills Blog

Managing sleep problems – a medication-free approach (i) — HealthSkills Blog

I’ve recently completed two posts on assessing sleep problems in people experiencing persistent pain, and today I turn my attention to strategies for managing sleep problems – without medication. Why without medication? Because to date there are no medications for insomnia that don’t require a ‘weaning off’ period, during which time people often find their […]

via Managing sleep problems – a medication-free approach (i) — HealthSkills Blog

They are so wrong!

An Op-Ed in the New York Post has lots to say about the motherhood on display at the Grammys. The author criticizes Beyoncé for her “tush-wiggling” and “pagan fertility worship” and finds Adele’s words about her struggles with motherhood “self indulgent.” I think the take home message from the column is supposed to be […]

via New York Post thinks Beyoncé should cover up and Adele shut up. They are so wrong. — Dr. Jen Gunter

#muslimban

Several years ago a young American woman went to Dubai for an adventure. It’s an amazing diaspora and from what I have heard from this woman and others it’s a great place to combine work and adventure and travel. It is a time to be free, to learn about other cultures, and bask in […]

via When a doctor tells you how the travel ban has affected her and you just want to cry — Dr. Jen Gunter

Pantsuits on ladies. A call to arms for modern suffrage.

Dr. Jen Gunter

votesI started November 8th so hopeful. The polls were a comfortable 78. I wore my new berry colored pantsuit purchased especially for the election. I even wore my suffragette sash to work. The last face I saw before stepping into my office was a young woman in her 20’s who gave me a thumbs up and that knowing smile that said, I’m with her too! Every woman I met had a gleam in her eye and a spring in her step. There was an estrogen electricity in the air. We were unbeatable.

Until we were not.

As a 50-year-old woman and surgeon I have felt the oppressive weight of misogyny my whole life. In medical school. In residency. In the 11 years that I fought to get the same salary as my male peers. And even from my mother who felt being a doctor might be too hard.

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